The Official London Pass

What’s the London Attractions Pass?

The Official London Pass is the most successful Attractions Pass for the City of London. It is your ticket to the city’s main attractions. The Pass allows you to visit more than 70 attractions free of charge, including Westminster Abbey, the Tower of London and Tower Bridge. The purchase price also includes a Hop-on Hop-off bus ride and a cruise on the River Thames.

The London Pass also gives you discounts and other benefits at around 40 restaurants, shops and attractions. The more free offers and discounts you use with your London Pass, the greater the savings compared to buying individual tickets.

There’s an option to add a travel card to your London Pass, allowing you to use public transport without having to buy any more tickets. In addition, the London Pass package includes a travel guide that provides information about the participating attractions, as well as the subway, buses and Hop-on Hop-off routes. You can download the guide for free in advance.

How Does the London Pass Work?

The London Pass is available in different versions. They differ only in their validity. Accordingly, the London Pass is valid for either 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 or 10 consecutive days. The longer the validity period, the more expensive the City Pass is – but the more time you have to visit as many attractions as you’d like.

After purchasing, you can simply use the London Pass in an app on your smartphone. At the participating attractions, you simply show the QR code in the app and receive your free admission ticket. Alternatively, you can print your London Pass or receive it by mail.

Benefits of the London Pass

  • Free entry to 70+ attractions
  • 1 day Hop-on Hop-off bus ride for free
  • Many discounts and other benefits
  • Optional: Travelcard for local public transport
  • Valid for up to 10 days after first use
  • + Free travel guide, city & metro map

This page contains partner links. This means that we receive a commission when you buy a product through an affiliate link (e.g. the London Pass). This does not make the product more expensive for you.

How Much Does the London Pass Cost?

The following table gives an overview of the prices available at Get Your Guide:

Attention: Prices on the official website differ from the above mentioned prices. The regular prices on LondonPass.com are more expensive than on Get Your Guide. However, sometimes the company offers discounts. Prices can be a bit cheaper then. This applies to London Passes for 3, 6 and 10 days. Check current prices on LondonPass.com now.

Information on Public Transport Option

The surcharge for public transport is optional and only available on the official LondonPass.com website. Adults receive a Visitor Oyster Card which is topped up with a credit. The amount of the credit is equal to the surcharge shown in the table less £5.00 activation fee. This means that if you add £30.00 to your 3-day pass, the Oyster Card will include a £25.00 credit which you can use to travel in London.

London Underground

In addition to your London Pass, you can buy an Oyster Card. Children under 10 do not need it though since they travel for free in London.

This credit will usually get you where need to be if you travel mainly in Zone 1 and Zone 2, where most of the attractions are located. In these zones, no more than £7.20 will be deducted from your Oyster Card per day, no matter how often you travel. However, if you travel outside these zones regularly, the credit will not be sufficient. You can top up your Oyster Card at any time at any subway station.

Children do not receive an Oyster Card, but a paper Travelcard. Only with the 10-day pass children also receive an Oyster Card. But watch out: Children up to 10 years always travel free of charge in London when accompanied by an adult. For children of this age the optional Travelcard is therefore never worthwhile.

What’s Included in the London Pass?

The following table shows all attractions included in the London Pass.

Last updated: 08/2020

London City Passes (UK) - London Pass

Attention: The single ticket prices in the table above are online prices. For most attractions, tickets purchased online are cheaper than admission tickets at the box office. On the official London Pass website they always show box office prices. However, it makes more sense for you to compare online prices to the purchasing price of the London Pass in order to find out whether the pass is worthwhile for you.

Our Assessment of the Included Attractions

The London Pass contains many interesting sights that are very popular with visitors. Top attractions include The View from the Shard, the Tower of London, Tower Bridge, Westminster Abbey, Windsor Castle, Wembley Stadium and St Paul’s Cathedral. In addition to these highlights, the London Pass offers a long list of attractions to visit on your second or third visit to London.

Included in London Pass: The Shard

The London Pass contains many top attractions, including the viewing platform on The Shard.

But the abundance of offers cannot hide the fact that some important sights are missing. This applies especially to London Eye, Madame Tussauds, London Dungeon, SEA LIFE Aquarium and Shrek’s Adventure – five attractions that are also offered together as Merlin’s Magical London Pass. If you want to see these attractions, you’ll have to buy tickets in addition to the London Pass and allow some time for visiting them.

Some London Pass offers seem more useful at first glance than they really are. Some museums are included in the pass – for example the National Gallery or the V&A Museum – which are free for visitors anyway. The London Pass only grants its holder a free audio guide, a free guide book or a visit to a special exhibition. The benefit of these offers is very small compared to the purchase price of the London Pass.

Other discounts, such as £2.00 savings on a walking tour, are also of little value. Some sights are also too cheap to be worth using the London Pass. The Pass can only pay off if you use it for the expensive sights. Therefore, the high number of attractions is somewhat misleading. Nevertheless, the London Pass contains the most of the important sights of all London City Passes.

Our Assessment of the Hop-on Hop-off Bus

With the London Pass you can choose which provider you would like to take a Hop-on Hop-off tour with: Big Bus London or Golden Tours. To make the City Pass worthwhile, you should take one of these trips. However, you should keep in mind that buses are often stuck in traffic jams. This means that on your bus tour you will enjoy a nice view and learn new information about London thanks to the audio guide, but you won’t make fast progress. You should therefore not use them as a typical means of transport, but only for a relaxed sightseeing tour.

Single tickets for Big Bus London and Golden Tours already include a boat trip on the Thames (some with a 24-hour ticket). Thus, the Thames trip included in the London Pass is not an additional offer, but included in the bus ticket anyway.

No Time Saving with the London Pass

City pass providers often claim you’ll save time with their Sightseeing Pass since you’ll benefit from fast-track entrance. As there are often long queues in front of London’s attractions during the high season, this would be a good argument for buying the London Pass. But meanwhile, the Pass does not offer any fast-track accesses anymore.

St. Paul's Cathedral included in London Pass

St. Paul’s Cathedral: One of London’s many top attractions where you have to reckon with waiting times at the entrance.

Therefore, despite your London Pass, you will have to queue at the ticket office at all attractions to pick up your free ticket. Afterwards, you will often have to queue again at the entrance or will be assigned a time for admission. The same happens to all other visitors who don’t have an online Fast-Track-Ticket, but the London Pass doesn’t make it any faster either. Due to the long waiting times and opening hours – many sights close in the afternoon – you won’t be able to visit more than two or three major attractions a day.

Maximum Credit Value per Day

With the London Pass you can basically take advantage of all the offers included in the pass, but there is a daily limit, which is measured with the so-called credit value. For example, with a 1-day pass you can take advantage of offers worth £195.00. The online prices listed in the table above do not count, but the prices at the box office. For example: At the box office, admission to St Paul’s Cathedral costs £20.00. Thus £20.00 will be deducted from your credit value when you visit the cathedral.

Credit Value per Pass

  • 1-day pass: £188.40
  • 2-day pass: £295.30
  • 3 Day Pass: £391.80
  • 6 Day Pass: £629.30
  • 10 Day Pass: £785.00

Due to long waiting times, awkward opening hours and heavy traffic in London you are unlikely to be able to use so much value with the London Pass. But since these restrictions exist, we would like to mention them here.

Our Assessment of the Local Transport Option

With the London Pass you can buy a travel card. Adults receive a Visitor Oyster Card, which you can use in buses and the Underground. However, there are no advantages to buying the Oyster Card together with your London Pass. Instead, it makes things more complicated. While you can always use your London Pass digitally on your smartphone, this is not possible if you buy the Oyster Card with it, as it is not available for smartphones.

If you book the London Pass including the Travelcard, you must have it sent to you in advance by mail. The delivery time is about 6 working days within the UK.

It would make more sense to buy the regular Oyster Card on your own after your arrival in London. You can get it for the same price at any subway station at any ticket vending machine or ticket counter.

London: Bus and Big Ben

You should buy the Oyster Card independently at the first Underground station you visit in London.

The travel card option is all the more useless for children up to the age of 10, as children of this age always travel free of charge on public transport. They do not need their own ticket. Young people between the ages of 11 and 15 travel at half price with their parents if a Young Visitor Discount is loaded onto the Oyster Card. You can find detailed information at Transport for London.

Validity of the London Pass

When you buy the London Pass at Get Your Guide, you specify the first day of use – but this date is not binding. After purchasing the London Pass you have 12 months to activate it. Activation takes place the first time you visit an attraction.

The London Pass is then valid for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 or 10 days, depending on which option you purchased. These are consecutive calendar days. This means that if you use a 3-day pass for the first time on a Tuesday, it will be valid until and including Thursday.

Since time is a scarce commodity with the London Pass, you should activate your pass early in the morning, not in the afternoon.

If you book the optional Travelcard, it will not activate your London Pass. This means, you can already use public transport without activating the pass.

Attention: On the official LondonPass.com website the pass is only available for 1, 2, 3, 6 or 10 days. Only at Get Your Guide you can get it for 4 or 5 days.

How Much Money Do You Save?

How much money you can save with the London Pass depends on how long the pass is valid, how many attractions you visit and how expensive they are.

We can estimate your savings using a 3-day pass as an example. The pass costs £116.00 and entitles you to use a maximum credit value of £391.80. As a result, the theoretical saving is £275.80. However, it will hardly be possible to visit so many sights in three days. There is not enough time.

In the following section we will show you how much money you can save with the London Pass using a 3-day itinerary and a 5-day itinerary as examples.

For a short three-day stay in London, you should limit yourself to attractions located in the city centre. The centre of London is big enough to do a lot of sightseeing in three days. It would take too much time to get to places further out by public transport. With the London Pass, time is a scarce commodity, as the pass is only worth it if you visit many sights in a short period of time.

The following 3-day programme should be feasible:

Day 1

  • Westminster Abbey: £18.00
  • Churchill War Rooms: £23.00
  • Hop-on Hop-off bus: £29.60

Westminster Abbey and the Churchill War Rooms are in the same neighbourhood just a stone’s throw apart. In the afternoon you can take a relaxed tour with the Hop-on Hop-off buses. We recommend that you do not use the buses as a classic means of transport, as they are slow and unreliable to get from A to B. You will enjoy the Hop-on Hop-off buses more if you use them for a sightseeing tour and get to know London with the audio guide.

Day 2

  • Tower of London: £25.00
  • 24h River Thames Cruise: £19.00
  • Royal Observatory Greenwich: £16.00
  • Optional: Cutty Sark Museum Ship £15.00

The second day starts at the Tower of London. From the ferry terminal “Tower” you take the River Cruise to Greenwich. There you can visit the Royal Observatory and if there is still time and you feel like it, also the Cutty Sark museum ship, which is located right at the pier. Afterwards you take the ferry back to the city (Westminster). With the London Pass you can get on and off the boat as often as you like within 24 hours.

Day 3

  • St. Paul’s Cathedral: £17.00
  • London Tower Bridge Exhibition: £10.60
  • HMS Belfast: £16.35
  • The View from the Shard: from £22.31

If you don’t mind a 30 minute walk in between, you can walk to all the attractions of the day. Start in the morning at St Paul’s Cathedral, then go to London Tower Bridge and check out the exhibition. On the other side of the bridge there are HMS Belfast and The Shard. You can visit the viewing platform until late in the evening.

This 3-day itinerary is worth up to £196.86. The London Pass for three days costs only £116, so you’ll save £80.86. There is also a further possible £15.00 saving on the Cutty Sark Museum ship.

This itinerary is realistic from our point of view, but you’ll be on your feet most of the time. Many places of interest – especially in high season – have long waiting times. The 3-day programme requires you to visit the first attraction of the day in the morning. Ideally, you will already be there when the gates of the attraction are opened.

Tip: If you need to pick up your London Pass in the city, do it the day before so you can start sightseeing in the morning on the first day of validity. However, it is better to use your London Pass digitally on your smartphone or print it out.

For a stay of five days in London you can take a little more time with sightseeing. With this validity, the London Pass is already worthwhile when you visit only two attractions per day. You don’t have to restrict yourself to the city centre – you can also visit places that require a longer journey time (but you’ll get the most out of the London Pass if you invest your time in sightseeing instead of riding the subway).

The following 5-day itinerary should be well feasible. It gives you a little leeway to visit attractions not covered by the London Pass or to explore the city’s streets and parks on foot. The programme builds on the 3-day itinerary:

Day 1

  • Westminster Abbey: £18.00
  • Churchill War Rooms: £23.00
  • Hop-on-hop-off bus: £29.60

Westminster Abbey and the Churchill War Rooms are in the same neighbourhood just a stone’s throw apart. You’ll also discover the Houses of Parliament and Big Ben next door.

In the afternoon you can take a relaxed tour with the Hop-on Hop-off buses. We recommend not to use the buses as a classic means of transport, as they are slow and unreliable to get from A to B. You’ll enjoy the Hop-on Hop-off buses more if you use them for a sightseeing tour and get to know London with the audio guide.

Day 2

  • Tower of London: £25.00
  • London Tower Bridge Exhibition: £10.60
  • St Paul’s Cathedral: £17.00

The second day starts at the Tower of London, where you can see the crown jewels and take part in a guided tour. Then you will go to the London Tower Bridge and discover it from a new perspective from the upper pedestrian bridge with a glass floor. You’ll also explore the inside of the bridge. In the afternoon you head for St Paul’s Cathedral, not far away.

Day 3

  • 24h River Thames Cruise: £19.00
  • Royal Observatory Greenwich: £16.00
  • Cutty Sark Museum Ship £15.00

On the third day you could make use of the River Thames Cruise which is included in the London Pass. You can board the boat 24 hours a day from Westminster and get off as often as you like. The River Cruise takes you to Greenwich, where you can visit the Royal Observatory and the Cutty Sark Museum Ship.

Day 4

  • HMS Belfast: £16.35
  • Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre tour: £17.00
  • The View from the Shard: from £22.31

Opposite the Tower of London, on the other side of the Thames is the HMS Belfast, a submarine you can visit. Next door is Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, which is also included in the London Pass. In the afternoon or evening you go up to the viewing platform “The View from the Shard” – one of the most expensive attractions included in the London Pass.

Day 5

Kensington Palace: £17.00
Royal Albert Hall guided tour: £13.75

The fifth day begins at Kensington Palace. Afterwards you can enjoy yourself at Kensington Gardens before taking a guided tour of the Royal Albert Hall. Later you can either visit one of the many free museums in the area or stroll through Hyde Park to Wellington Arch (included in the London Pass) and Buckingham Palace.

With this exemplary 5-day itinerary you can take advantage of up to £259.61 worth of benefits. The London Pass for five days is only £149.00, so you’ll save a staggering £110.61.

From our point of view, this tour is realistic, but you’ll be on your feet most of the time. At many sights you have to reckon with long waiting times – especially in the high season. On some days, the 5-day programme requires you to visit the first attraction of the day in the morning. Ideally, you will already be there when the gates of the attraction are opened.

On some days you may also have time to explore sights that are not included in the London Pass. This is best done before you activate the Pass or after the validity of the Attractions Pass has expired.

Is the London Pass Worth it?

To make the London Pass worthwhile, you should prepare yourself for a few days of intense sightseeing. Time is a scarce commodity with the London Pass, so you should visit your first attraction early in the morning as soon as it is open. At this time of day the queues are the shortest. You should take advantage of two to three offers every day in order to achieve high savings.

The Longer the Pass is Valid, the More You’ll Save

The longer the London Pass is valid, the more rewarding it is. The following list shows how much the London Pass costs per day:

  • 1-day pass: £79.00 per day
  • 2-day pass: £49.50 per day
  • 3-day pass: £38.66 per day
  • 4-day pass: £34.75 per day
  • 5-day pass: £29.80 per day
  • 6-day pass: £25.83 per day
  • 10-day pass: £18.90 per day

These prices per day apply if you buy the London Pass at the normal price. However, sometimes it is reduced and costs even less.

The price differences are huge! Significant savings with the London Pass are only possible from 3 days upwards. With a 6-day pass you can save lots of money if you visit only two attractions every day. The 10-day pass pays for itself if you visit just one sight per day.

Windsor Castle near London

The longer the London Pass is valid, the more worthwhile it is. The most money you’ll save with the 10-day pass. You’ll even have enough time to visit Windsor Castle.

By the way: The pass is more worthwhile in the low season than in the high season, when London is overcrowded by tourists. In autumn and winter the queues are shorter, so you should be able to do some more sightseeing. However, some attractions close a little earlier in winter.

Conclusion: The London Pass is worth it if you are in London for more than a couple of days – ideally a week – and if you know what you want to see and are willing to visit at least two attractions a day.

When Isn’t the London Pass Worth it?

The London Pass for only 1 or 2 days is hardly worth it. To save £79.00 on a 1-day pass you would have to visit three of the most expensive attractions. Experience has shown that this can only be achieved if you leave early in the morning as soon as the first sights open their doors. Maybe you can save a few pounds with the pass, but is it worth buying the London Pass and still queuing in front of the attractions?

With the 2-day pass, the value for money is a little better, but even so it’s hardly worth buying the London Pass and waiting in front of the attractions. For short visits to London, we recommend buying online tickets or bundle tickets with Discount London. Often you’ll also save time with these tickets.

The London Pass is not Worthwhile for Some Attractions

For some of the cheaper sights, the London Pass is not worthwhile. An attraction should cost at least £15.00 when purchased individually, so that it is worth using the London Pass for it. The only exception is the 10-day pass, which is so cheap on a daily basis that almost every attraction is worth visiting with the Pass.

Also, if you are mainly interested in the big museums of London, the London Pass is not worthwhile, as public museums are basically free of charge in London. With the London Pass, you will at best receive a free audio guide or a guide book or you can visit a special exhibition. It is not worth staying for hours in a free museum and only getting a £5.00 discount.

A few important sights are not included in the London Pass. This is especially true for Merlin’s Magical London Pass: Madame Tussauds, London Eye, London Dungeon, Shrek’s Adventure and SEA LIFE Aquarium. If you are particularly interested in these attractions, the London Pass is not worth it.

Where Can You Get the London Pass?

You can buy the London Pass online at various websites. We recommend buying the London Pass at Get Your Guide for three reasons:

  • The London Pass is cheaper at Get Your Guide than at LondonPass.com – unless there’s  a promotion going on at the official website.
  • You can get the London Pass for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 or 10 consecutive days at Get Your Guide.  The 4-day pass and the 5-day pass are not available on LondonPass.com.
  • You can cancel your London Pass up to 24 hours before you were about to start using the Pass. No questions asked.

Of course you can also by the London Pass at the official site LondonPass.com.

After the purchase there are two ways to use your London Pass:

1st Option: Mobile Pass for Your Smartphone

After the purchase at Get Your Guide and LondonPass.com you will receive your London Pass digitally. You can either print it out on paper and show the QR code at each attraction or you can save the digital pass on your smartphone. There’s also a handy London Pass App for that.

This is the easiest and fastest way to use your London Pass. Download the London Pass App from the App Store (available for iOs and Android) and enter the London Pass number stated on your voucher. Then show the app at the entrance of each attraction. Your individual QR code will be scanned there.

Note: If you want to use the London Pass on your smartphone, don’t buy the Travelcard with it. With this option you will need to pick up your Pass including the Visitor Oyster Card in central London. Instead buy the regular Oyster Card at any metro station in London.

London Pass App

2nd Option: Receive Your London Pass by Mail

If you don’t want to use the London Pass on your smartphone and don’t want to print it out, you can have it sent to you by post. You have to buy it on LondonPass.com and you should order it well ahead of time. The shipping time within the UK is 6 working days. Postage will be £2.95. Express shipping takes 4 working days and costs £7.95. Delivery times are only approximate, so you should allow for more time as a precaution.

This is a good option if you plan to buy the optional Travelcard and if there’s still enough time for shipping before your trip to London.

What We Like About the London Pass

The selection of attractions included in the London Pass is really good and comprehensive. No other City Pass includes that many sights.

The London Pass is worth it for visits of 3 days or more. The longer the Pass is valid, the more worthwhile it is. If you spend several days in London, the pass will pay off for you.

There is a mobile option for the London Pass. Simply download it to your smartphone and use it immediately at the first attraction. This is very convenient.

If you buy the Pass at Get Your Guide, the purchase can be cancelled free of charge without giving any reason. This can be done up to 24 hours before departure.

What We Don’t Like About the London Pass

The attractions of Merlin’s Magical London (Madame Tussauds, London Eye etc.) are missing in the London Pass.

The London Pass for 1 or 2 days is hardly worth it, as there is not enough time to visit enough attractions.

With the London Pass you have to queue at every attraction. In the high season you should expect long waiting times. That’s why you can’t visit more than two or three attractions a day. However, this applies to all London City Passes.

The optional Travelcard offers no advantage. Visitors to London should rather buy the Oyster Card at a ticket vending machine.

FAQ About the London Pass

No, each attraction can only be visited once with the London Pass. Your ticket will be electronically validated upon admission.

Once you have purchased your London Pass online, you have 12 months to exchange your voucher for your London Pass or activate your mobile ticket.

The pass will not be activated until you use it for the first time at an attraction. The City Pass is then valid for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 or 10 consecutive days, depending on which option you purchased.

These are calendar days. For example, the 3-day pass is valid from Tuesday to Thursday.

Basically, yes. Most sights are open almost every day. Only during the Christmas season you have to reckon with restrictions.

Note, however, that many attractions close in the late afternoon. The opening hours and sometimes long waiting times should be taken into account when planning your trip.

The London Pass is also available for children between the ages of 5 and 15. They pay a reduced price. Older kids must pay the regular price. Children under 5 do not need their own London Pass. For them admission is free at many attractions.

If you have any questions, please contact the publisher of the London Pass. You can find information about the Pass on the official website. You can contact customer support by email at info@londonpass.com or by telephone: +44 (0) 20 7293 0972.

If your question concerns the purchase at Get Your Guide, please contact their customer service.

Yes, if you buy the London Pass at Get Your Guide, you can cancel the purchase free of charge up to 24 hours before the start of your journey.

When you purchase your London Pass on the official website, there is a 30 day money back guarantee. Please email info@londonpass.com up to 30 days after purchase.

Alternatives to the London Pass

The London Pass isn’t worth it for you? For most attractions in London you can buy single tickets on the internet and – if necessary – reserve a fixed time slot for your visit. A pre-purchased ticket often saves you long waiting times, which can extend over several hours in the high season for popular attractions:

Ticket bundles can be a good alternative to single tickets and city passes. One of the most popular bundles is Merlin’s Magical London 5-in-1 Pass, which allows you to visit Madame Tussauds, London Eye, London Dungeon, Shrek’s Adventure and SEA LIFE Aquarium for just £70.00.

Other discounted ticket bundles are available at Discount London.

More London City Passes

London Turbopass
London Explorer Pass
London iVenture Card